HSBO 2014 Presenters Bios & Abstracts

Keynote Speaker

 

Director Netherlands Coastguard E(d).H. Veen

ED Veen became the Coastguard Director in March 2012. He joined the coastguard following a career in the Royal Netherlands Navy. During his seagoing years he commanded submarines, a frigate and a Landing Platform Dock.

Ed Veen started his naval career as an Operational Branch Midshipman. Commissioned in 1982 his first appointment was on board submarines. In 1993 on successful completion of the UK Submarine Command Course (SMCC) he assumed command subsequently of HNLMS Zwaardvis, HNLMS Zeeleeuw and HNLMS Tijgerhaai. On completion of his commands he joined the sea training organisation FOST (submarines) in Faslane as command searider. In 1997 Veen joined the service flotilla as Executive Officer of an M-frigate. In which he completed a work-up and an operational deployment in the Persian Gulf. In 1999 after completing the Senior Staff Course Veen was appointed as a senior-consultant to the Royal Netherlands Navy Directorate of Economic Control. In late 2000 Commander Veen assumed responsibility for the education and training of submarine personnel within the Operations School, Den Helder. An integral function of this appointment was the duty of directing the SMCC, a function better known as “Teacher”. In this responsibility he assessed suitability of (international) candidates for submarine command

In 2002 Veen assumed command of HNLMS Abraham van der Hulst. During this period his ship acted as flagship in support of operation Active Endeavour. In 2003 Veen was transferred to the Ministry of Defence to help to set up a new section within Directorate of Operational Policy of the Defence Staff. In between he completed his master’s degree in public administration. On 12th May of 2006 Veen was promoted to Captain and was appointed as the first Commanding Officer of Landing Platform Dock 2 HNLMS Johan de Witt. In September 2008 Captain Veen was assigned as head of the Maritime Warfare Centre. In 2011 Veen took again command of HNLMS Johan de Witt to conduct a coastguard and counterdrug operation in the Caribbean. This was his last tour of duty in the Navy. In march 2012 Veen assumed the position of Director Coastguard.

Besides his work Veen is active in the local politics of his home town Haarlem as councillor. In 2012 he published a paper for “The Hague Centre of Strategic Studies” titled “The sea: Playground of the superpowers.” In this paper he tried to answer the question: “How and why are superpowers making their presence felt in the maritime domain”. Veen is married and has two sons.

Slip, trip, flip and ejection

I will be looking at a number of accidents caused by hooking. The focus will be on those resulting in an ejection. The examples I will refer to occurred in the UK, and are taken mainly from the leisure and powerboat racing sectors. I will be interpreting the incidents from the point of view of training to reduce the occurrence of slips, trips and flips. The focus will be on lessons learned and how the Royal Yachting Association has worked with the MAIB and other industry stake holders to increase public awareness of safety whilst boating and how this feeds into our training schemes.

Rachel Andrews

I have been working in the watersports industry as an instructor and a professional skipper for the past 15 years, during which time it has been my pleasure to work on a range of boats from small tiller-steered dories to larger offshore RIBS and motor cruisers. I thrive on introducing people to watersports as well as encouraging skills development. I have delivered training to a varied spectrum of boaters, from those buying their first boat, to coastguard agencies seeking further training for their boat crews. For the last 8 years, I have been training instructors within the Royal Yachting Association training schemes. I now work as the RYA’s Chief Instructor, Motor Cruising and Power, which I have been doing since early 2011.

 

 

Seakeeping

Seakeeping ability is a measure of how well-suited a watercraft is to conditions when underway.
A ship or boat which has good seakeeping ability is said to be very seaworthy and is able to operate effectively even in high sea states.  But my Dad says, “When it gets rough they all go the same speed,suggesting that differences in size of hull geometry don’t make a substantive difference.
10 years’ experience in naval architecture at Donald L. Blount & Associates has shown me that this is not true – some boats are better than others.  The operator can affect ride quality, but it’s the boat geometry that has the primary influence.  Selecting a good set of geometry for the hull is up to the designer, and it isn’t just luck!  This session will introduce you to the steps we use at DLBA.

Jeffrey Bowles holds a Bachelor of Science degree in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Webb Institute, and a Master of Science degree in marine engineering from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. In 2001 he joined Donald L. Blount and Associates where he is currently employed as the Technical Director.  Jeff is a licensed Professional Engineer License in the US states of Virginia and Florida, and is certified as a project Management Professional by the Project Management Institute.   Jeff’s past projects at DLBA include high speed custom sportfisherman, large semi-planing motor yachts, production boats, and unmanned surface vessels.

Long term measurement in the Swedish Coast Guard for
assessment of HSC crew exposure to vibration and shock

The starting point is conditions aboard a small high speed coast guard unit that was investigated from the request of the crew. It turned out to represent everyday conditions; still indicating vibration exposure above legislated limits. Further, the presentation address the measurement and feedback systems today installed aboard Swedish Coast guard HSC as a result of the findings. The third part of the presentation brings forward a simulation scheme for rational simulation-based prediction and evaluation of crew exposure to vibration and shock.

Karl Garme Graduated from KTH in Stockholm as Naval Architect 1995 and PhD 2004. The main topic is ship hydrodynamics and the licentiate thesis as well as the PhD thesis address modelling of planning craft in waves. The experience from high speed craft has widened the research field to the working conditions aboard, in particular whole body vibration and shock. Waves have had a central role and has inspired towards wake wash modelling and the relationship between wash, fuel consumption and erosion.

Insight and experience in the full-scale test situation, with its complexity in coordinating human and material resources, vessel instrumentation and measurement of the incident wave system have been gained from several studies mainly in cooperation with the Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV) and the Swedish Coast Guard (KBV).

Lifetime upgrading of UK MoD fleet of high speed boats

The Control of Vibration at Work Regulations (2005) and The Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessel (Control of Vibration at Work) Regulations (2007) along with EU legislation (2002/44/EC), place requirements on employers and employees to, mitigate the risk of harm from exposure to Whole Body Vibration and Shock.

As part of the Maritime Whole Body Vibration project the Ministry of Defence is investigating a variety of technical measures which could be applicable to their in-service and future vessels.

This paper describes the work undertaken to date to develop technical solutions which will contribute to reducing risk to the MoD’s employees from shock and vibration, including seat testing protocols and operator guidance. This must be done while maintaining current maritime capability and integrating with current and future infrastructure and support.

Dr Thomas Coe is a Consultant Naval Architect with Frazer-Nash Consultancy currently on secondment to the Naval Design Partnership as the High Speed Craft Group Manager and Technical Lead of the MoD’s Maritime Whole Body Vibration Project. He has an extensive background in WBV in small fast craft having completed a PhD in the subject from Southampton University and is a member of a number of international committees on the subject. Prior to joining the NDP he worked on a variety of projects for Frazer-Nash including small craft design tool development, test rig design and development of lightweight composite solutions for dismounted infantry.

 

UK MoD Approach to Managing Whole Body Shock
and Vibration in Small Fast Craft

The introduction of UK Legislation to limit the exposure of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) to employees in their working environment created the potential to reduce the operational capability of the UK MoD when operating small fast craft.  In the maritime environment the daily 8-hour WBV exposure limit can be exceeded well within 2 hours when conducting certain mission profiles on the current craft. The presentation outlines the approach that the MoD is taking to manage exposure in accordance with the law to ensure the risk of exposure is as As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP).  The MoD is taking a multi-faceted approach addressing training, doctrine, culture, monitoring of exposure levels, health surveillance and equipment.  This is a complex issue, made all the more so for the MoD because of the diverse range of military tasking undertaken; an annual user population of approx. 5000 people (crew and passengers), utilising over 1000 boats in 28 classes covering operations by the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Army and MoD Police all of which have differing mission profiles and procedures. This presentation will be of interest to any organisation which operates or designs small fast craft in the leisure, commercial, emergency, government and military sectors.

 

Cdr R Finnemore RN (Rtd)
NCS Ltd representing UK MoD

Cdr Finnemore joined the Royal Navy in the late 70’s and spent the following 20 years at sea serving as a warfare office in frigates.  He ultimately specialised as a Staff Warfare Officer (Underwater) (SWO (U)) with particular expertise in passive anti submarine warfare.  In his later career he spent time in procurement and logistic staff appointments at MoD Abbey Wood and in his final appointment was Cdr Seamanship for the Sea Systems Group with responsibility for the acceptance of the seamanship aspects of the first three T45 Destroyers to enter service and the safety aspects of all other seamanship equipment including small fast craft. He initiated the UK MoD Maritime Whole Body Vibration  programme in 2009.  He retired from active service in Dec 2010 and in 2011 was asked by Director Ships to return as a consultant and manage the UK MWBV Programme which he continues to do.

 

The Damen Sea Axe

Worldwide, the majority of high speed vessels is designed for “trial conditions”. This is the condition in which the promised speed of a ship has to be proven to the customer. To limit speed degradation due to wind and waves, “trial conditions” basically means “no wind” and “no waves”. As a result of designing for “trial conditions”, many high speed vessels worldwide perform well on flat water, but show serious shortcomings in the “real world” of our customers: on the sea. In waves of some significance, these vessels have to slow down to keep the crew – and the ship – in one piece.

In the beginning of the 80’s, Damen and Delft University joined forces to change the high speed craft design philosophy and started to design for “operability at sea” instead of “trial conditions”.

The most distinct results of the co-operation are the “Enlarged Ship Concept” (1998) and the “Axe Bow Concept” (2006) – commercially called “Sea Axe” by Damen.

The Sea Axe is the result of years of joint research, carried out by Delft University of Technology, Damen, the US Coast Guard, the Royal Netherlands Navy and the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands. The Sea Axe earns her name from the side view of the bow: the keel line slopes down forward and the sheer line slopes up – strongly resembling the blade of an axe.

The Sea Axe is a further development of the “Enlarged Ship Concept”. This concept is based on lengthening the hull of a ship, without increasing the functionality. A more slender hull shape is the result, which cuts through the waves more easily. Damen has successfully applied the Enlarged Ship Concept in patrol boat designs. Many cost Guards (including USCG) have chosen these Damen designs since 1998 (100+ vessels).

The Sea Axe takes the “Enlarged Ship philosophy” to the limit. The extremely slender and deep bow, without any flare, provides unprecedented soft seakeeping characteristics: 80% lower vertical peak accelerations compared to conventional hull forms . Where conventional high speed vessels bounce over the waves, the Sea Axe effortlessly cuts through them. As a result, the Sea Axe can sail at maximum speed, almost independent of the circumstances. Besides, the slender hull form has a low resistance. On flat water the difference compared to conventional vessels is in the order of 12%. This advantage increases in a seaway, as the added resistance or the Sea Axe is much lower: 18% in Sea State 3, 22% in Sea State 4.

Since 2006, more than 120 Sea Axes have been sold by Damen, varying in length from 19 m to 67 m.

Jaap Gelling graduated on shiphydromechanics in 1986 at Delft University of Technology. After serving for the Royal Netherlands Navy, he initially worked in a small (co-founded) marine propulsion development company. Since 1992, Jaap Gelling is employed by the Damen Shipyards Group. After jobs as propulsion specialist, Manager Corporate Research and Director Production & Services, since 2003 he is Director High Speed Craft. High Speed Craft is the Department which is responsible for all high speed workboats in the Damen Group. Product series of High Speed Craft are Patrol Boats, Interceptors, Crew Boats, Fast Suppliers, Pilot Boats and Tenders.

Being personally interested in maritime research & development, Jaap Gelling – together with his team – puts much effort in optimizing the design of Damen high speed vessels. A part of this work is “evolutionary”: ongoing improvement of standardized ships. More “revolutionary” projects – like the development of the Sea Axe hullshape – are carried out in a joint research program with the Shiphydromechanics Laboratory of Delft University of Technology.

 

 

New Fast Interceptor Craft

“ The 45+ knots Fast Interceptor Craft is very effective for wide range of duties. It can be used by military, para-military, law enforcement agencies, ambulance services, as pilot boat and for search & rescue operations, where speed is the essence to save lives. The deep-vee chine hull form with sharp water entry ensures a soft ride in adverse sea conditions. The craft’s model has been tested at Wolfson, UK. Vacuum infusion process is used for building the hull, ensuring significant strength gains intrinsic to the technology. The craft has excellent sea-keeping and dynamic stability capability, meeting all crew comfort & safety measures at high speed. Ample space on upper deck and inside can be well utilised and customized, in respect of accommodation, machinery, equipment, remote operated guns, systems as desired by customer. The craft has clocked speed of 50+ knots during trials and is capable of higher speeds with suitably powered propulsion package.”

Cdr SK Raghav joined Indian Navy in 1972 and served for 33 years. He is a Marine Engineer and a Naval Architect as well. He was largely associated with design, construction and modernisations of ships and submarines, in India, Germany and Russian yards. He has been with Solas Marine Group since last 5 years, associated mainly with construction of small crafts, at their yard in Sri Lanka and finds this experience extremely amazing.

Dr. Albert Nazarov holds the degree in Naval Architecture from Sevastopol National Technical University (1996) and Ph.D. in Ship Dynamics from Odessa National Maritime Academy (2004). His experience includes development of stability and damage control software for merchant and naval ships, performance and seakeeping predictions for sailing boats and advanced high speed craft. His current position is managing director at Albatross Marine Design – Thailand-based design office specializing on yachts and pleasure boats, small commercial and special high-speed craft, with special expertise in catamaran design. Albert is the author of about 90 research papers on small craft and ship design; he is a member of RINA, SNAME and currently chairman of SNAME Technical Committee SC-5 ‘Small passenger Vessels’.

 

‘The Mechanics of High Speed Boat Accidents (and how to prevent them)

The Author takes the more common high speed planing craft accident scenarios and shows, broadly, the underlying forces on the hull which cause the craft to react to the particular situation in the way that it does.   By understanding more about why a boat ‘hooks’, rolls or ‘stuffs’ it is hoped that the driver will be able to foresee the likely effect the sea conditions will have on his boat and will be able to avoid putting himself, his passengers and his craft into a potentially dangerous situation.

Lorne Campbell is an independant Naval Architect, Designer and Consultant specialising in high speed marine powercraft for all fields of operation.

Apprenticed to Vosper Ltd (1965 – 1970) he attended Newcastle University and Portsmouth Polytechnic.

He moved to Fairey Marine and then Rotork Marine before helping to set up Capoco Design Ltd, contract designers for the marine and automotive industries, in 1977.  Leaving Capoco in 1981 he has operated, since, as Lorne Campbell Design in the design and consultancy of a wide variety of fast leisure, commercial, military and racing powercraft.

Over the years a large number of offshore racing powerboats have been designed gaining 11 world championships, 28 national and other championships plus 11 world records.  In August 2005 ‘Bradstone Challenger’, a Bladerunner 51, gained the round Britain record in a time of 27 hours 10 minutes, cutting more than three and a half hours off the previous record.  This gave an official average speed of 50.16 knots (57.8 mph) including 5 re-fuelling stops.  He is a specialist in high speed craft and has worked on craft with speeds of up to 150 mph.

In recent years he has operated mainly as a specialist designer and consultant on the hull design and performance of high speed marine craft for military and commercial use.

He is a Fellow of The Royal Institution of Naval Architects, has been a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, serves on the RINA Small Craft Committee and is registered with the Engineer’s Registration Board as an Incorporated Engineer.  Past positions have included serving on the Royal Yachting Association’s Technical / UIM Working Group for Offshore Powerboat Racing, and on the judging panel for the British Marine Federation/RINA ‘Concept Boat’ design competition.

 

Amphibious  vessels

Roy Nouhra
President ASIS Boats

Roy Raymond Nouhra is a Lebanese-Canadian businessman. He began his career managing his family business in Dubai, Solico Group of Companies in 1998 along with his brother and eventually moved to the position of Co-CEO and shareholder. The company covers the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas, specializing in manufacturing, trading, contracting, investments and philanthropy offering expertise to governments, corporations and individuals.

ASIS boats, a division of Solico, were later established with Roy at the helm. ASIS Boats have a comprehensive and dedicated range of boats designed and built to accommodate all sectors; recreation, commercial and military. He is also CEO of Ocean Craft Marine, USA, a company that specializes in customized built military boats for the US Armed Forces.

Roy Raymond Nouhra holds both a B. Eng and Masters of Engineering  Degree from The George Washington University as well as a  Business Degree from Harvard Business School.

 

The Challenges and Solutions for Integrating Ships and Boats

Dr Colin Cain                    Naval Architect, Longitude Engineering
Dean Goves                       Naval Architect, Longitude Engineering
Andrew Hughes               Programme Manager, BAE Systems Small Boats

The launch and recovery of boats from ships in higher sea states is a potentially hazardous evolution but one that is performed routinely in many sectors of the marine industry. The interactions are complex and require a portfolio of tools and techniques to understand them correctly. The full capability of these systems is only realised when both the ship and boat solutions are developed in partnership, with a view of the complete system. Where this does not occur one side must inevitably carry the compromise. Overly robust craft may pay a penalty on performance that undermines their key roles and ships may be adversely affected by complex recovery systems. In this presentation Longitude Engineering and BAE Systems will discuss systems and boats that show how, when partnered correctly, the full capability of both ship and boat can be realised in both the military and commercial sectors. The key lessons and benefits of an integrated approach will be detailed and it will be shown how this can be achieved in a cost effective manner.

Andrew Hughes is employed by BAE Systems Small Boats Portsmouth as a Programme Manager.  His role is to determine and implement the exact needs of the client and this is based on his boat and industry knowledge and his understanding of the customer, the eventual end users expectation and budget constraints.

He also leads the company’s business development programme for all new boats specifically designed for the military, both in the UK and overseas.  The company design, manufacture and service a range of craft ranging from 6 metres to 18 metres in size and are configured to enhance the operational profile and exacting standard of the customer fleet of fast craft and RIBs.

Andrew has also been involved with the manufacturing of military craft for over 25 years with his previous experience including commissioning and trials engineer on a range of craft as Fast Inceptors, raiding and landing craft as well as military patrol boats.

He is an experienced Project Manager with qualifications as Senior Coxswain, Yachtmaster and RYA instructor.  Further experience has been gained from previously working at RTK Marine, Fairline and VT Halmatic with extensive work undertaken in Europe and the Middle East as well as Africa and Asia.

Colin Cain

Colin Cain holds the position of Associate Director at Longitude Engineering. Longitude Engineering provides independent specialist engineering support to deliver marine projects across the total life cycle, providing services that range from the design and analysis of large offshore structures to the development of military boats. Colin helped to establish the Defence and Small Craft business streams of the company, and in this role he has recently led extensive projects with a number of large Defence prime contractors. This has included the development of innovative at-sea docking systems for vessels ranging from nuclear submarines to high performance small craft, in all cases delivering considerable new capabilities for the customer. He is experienced in concept design, detailed design, manufacturing and trials, and in the project management skills necessary to successfully deliver complex engineering projects.

Colin previously managed engineering teams at VT Halmatic/ BAE Systems, and has led the design and testing of military, commercial and rescue craft, many of them daughter boats. In this role he was responsible for numerous bids ranging from Offshore Patrol Vessels to Fast Interceptor Craft. At Longitude, Colin supports vessel procurement programmes on behalf of both fleet owners and yards. He began his career as a Senior Naval Architect at the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, developing many of the current RNLI fleet, and is also an experienced practitioner of marine Product Safety, in which he holds a PhD.

Dean Goves

Dean Goves holds the position of Consultant Naval Architect at Longitude Engineering, and is responsible for leading a variety of engineering projects. In particular he has recently worked with major oil and gas companies to investigate the use of large rescue craft in extreme offshore applications. He is experienced in the development of unmanned craft and their associated technologies, both on the surface and underwater. Longitude are currently contributing extensively to Defence programmes in this field.

Dean previously led the BAE Systems Small Boat technical team, and is practiced in the through-life support of front line military craft. He is currently responsible for the engineering aspects behind a number of major boat modification/ upgrade programmes, and is knowledgeable in aspects such as marine systems, manufacturing and legislation, as well as in specialist areas such as design for air transportation. He began his career at VT Shipbuilding and is a qualified project manager.

 

Propulsion Systems

Selecting the appropriate propulsion system is paramount to attaining vessels that meet the operational needs of the end user. This presentation demonstrates the significance of a proper understanding of propulsion systems that must be carefully considered by procurement staff. With so many options available, the first step is identifying the performance envelope. This includes operational speed, vessel handling, range, efficiency, and safety. The propulsion systems to be discussed are outboard engines, stern drives, surface drives, water jets, pods drives, and traditional shaft & wheel applications. Understanding the relationship between propulsion type, hull form, and LCG is vital. Given the fact that the heaviest items on a boat are the main engines, weight placement is a strategic decision. Different propulsions systems also deliver different angles of thrust, a factor that is often overlooked.

Selecting the wrong propulsion system for your application can lead to highly undesirable consequences, including serious safety compromises, weight and balance issues, instability, inefficiency, poor handling, and ultimately wasted money.

 

Josh Armstrong
Founder/President/CEO
Armstrong Marine, Inc.

Josh Armstrong is the Founder and current President & CEO of Armstrong Marine, Inc. Armstrong Marine designs and builds welded aluminum boats in Port Angeles, Washington and Swansboro, North Carolina. Armstrong’s client base spans four continents and includes government agencies, commercial contractors, and private individuals. Producing vessels that service dozens of industries, these include patrol boats, pilot boats, passenger boats, research boats, dive boats, fire boats, and fish boats. Armstrong vessels can now be found in service around the world, meeting the growing global demands of the marine industry.

The bulk of Josh’s expertise is the result of hands-on and life-long learning. He began building boats at the young age of 18, and has been on the water or in the shop ever since. Having been in the business for 26 years, Josh and his team have built over 1200 vessels and he has learned management in the trenches. As a result, Josh has developed a broad skill set, and unique insight and expertise in advanced marine aluminum manufacturing, including everything from hull design to propulsion systems. Josh’s vision and strategic planning leads the team.  Day to day he is involved in all parts of the business from marketing decisions to high tech production equipment and value stream mapping. High performance designs and quality workmanship distinguish a reputation that fuels the company’s growth under Josh’s leadership. In addition to his experience operating vessels of all types, Josh is also a pilot.

 

Effective Prototype to Full Scale Development
Methods for Innovative High Speed Vessel Designs
By

Andrew S.N Lea and George P.L Robson

The fundamental necessity to push new hull and vessel design concepts can often be restricted due to high costs and often unreliable high speed model data.  This presentation opens up various innovative techniques incorporated by the authors in their PX18 program with successful results.  An introduction to each step of the process shall be made, which is intended to open up the possibilities of producing working concepts for both individuals and companies alike.  Beginning with classic empirical methods in which parameters can easily be fed through 3D modelling, and design looped, this can then be verified and optimised further using CFD, as well as FEA to optimise the structural performance.  Then introducing in house towing experiments and the gathering of data through to cost effective prototype scale builds and testing.  Finally looping real-time test data with the empirical, CFD and FEA results to fully optimise prior to committing to a full scale build, provides the highest chances of success.

George Robson

George currently works as a design engineer for Ricardo, and has a particular interest in Composites (Design and Manufacture), Stress and Fluid dynamics

As an engineer George has worked in the following sectors:
Automotive: BMW, Honda, Mitsubishi, GE, Mclaren, Avtovaz, etc
Building Industry: Shard of Glass & UK Supreme Court, Chelsea Barracks, etc
Wind turbine: Vestas Wind turbines including V164 (82m blade),
Motorsport: Racing car and motorbike components: Marcos, Porsche, Tampoli LMP2, Triumph
Aerospace: Rolls Royce carbon turbine blades & underwater propulsion units, Airbus, Boeing, Sukhoi, Comac, Agusta Westland, etc
He has predominantly focused on design in Catia V5; FEA in ANSYS, in particular composite FEA in ACP; and CFD in CFX and FLUENT, although has experience in a number of other packages.

On the marine side, he worked as the composite engineer on Earthrace prior to its successful circumnavigation record in 2008, and has worked on a number of marine projects since, all focused towards maritime records.

George has a particular interest in working on high speed vessel design, in particular wavepiercers, and in applying modern computational optimisation tools utilised in the aerospace and automotive sectors, but which are not commonly used in the marine industry currently.

Andrew S.N. Lea B.Sc.

Has involved himself with a number of progressive companies and projects during his career.  After completing his Naval Architecture degree in Florida, he remained in the USA as Chief Naval Architect for U.S. Naval Contractor “Structural Composites”, followed by a position as Naval Architect and Project Manager for “Magnum Marine”.  After which he left the USA to lead developmental programs with the Class One “Victory Team”.  Various design programs and builds followed, all relating to very high speed applications.

Currently involved with “Abu Dhabi Mar” as Director of Advanced Programs, where multiple innovative high speed designs have been realized from computational analysis to prototype testing thru to series builds, most being of military and leisure profiles.  Various contractual works continue for international builders, including hull and powering advancements, all developed to push the boundaries of high speed vessel design and production.

 

RIB aerial delivery for counter terrorism,
anti piracy and search and rescue operations

Rick Allamby MBE
Airborne Systems Limited

Rick started his career with the British Army in 1971 and served with the British Armed Forces until 1993. Throughout this time he served as an Air Despatcher involved in the airdrop of stores and equipment from UK and USA military aircraft and the movement of equipment by Helicopter. During his military career he served on operational tours in Northern Ireland, the Falklands and the Gulf and in 1992 was awarded the MBE for his efforts supporting the British Special Forces during the first Gulf War.

On leaving the Army Rick joined Irvin Aerospace as a Project Engineer and worked on numerous airdrop and military equipment projects. In 2001, due to the amalgamation of Irvin Aerospace and GQ Parachutes, Rick relocated and became part of the newly formed Airborne Systems Limited. At this time he took on his current role as Business Development Manager with responsibility for aerial delivery systems, military air cargo equipment and helicopter troop insertion and extraction systems.

He has been instrumental in the development of Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) airdrop systems for the parachute insertion of large RIB’s followed by Special Forces troops, a system that is now in-operational use in a number of countries.

For the last 40 years Rick has been involved in military aerial delivery and helicopter operations and in this time has amassed a vast amount of expertise in the airdropping of stores and equipment from numerous military aircraft worldwide.
Acceleration data is routinely recorded by researchers around the world to characterize the dynamic response of high-speed planing craft to wave impacts. The measured responses are then used in numerous naval architecture and marine engineering study areas, including hull structure design, equipment ruggedness, shock mitigation seat evaluations, and crew comfort and safety. This tutorial presents a systematic presentation of the fundamental rationale that overarches these different focus areas, and summarizes computational steps that transition raw acceleration data to repeatable measures for quantifying wave impact load that can be used in all areas of study. The lecturers apply the principles of response mode decomposition using fundamental concepts of solid mechanics, coupled with simplified dynamic input and response theory are presented to suggest that a unified approach to acceleration data processing could lead to synergistic advances throughout the communities of
interest, including full-scale trials and scale-model experimentation. Several examples of full-scale trials data are presented to illustrate the computational steps. Experimental results are summarized, and new empirical equations are presented for estimating variation in peak acceleration as a function of craft weight, significant wave height, and craft average speed. Historical criteria for estimating naval crew comfort and performance are used to illustrate development of ride severity envelopes for high-speed planing craft. 

 

 

Build the boat around the people –
with due consideration of legal and legislative aspects, duty of care and liability.

This presentation sets out considerations for designers, boat builders, end users and operators alike in terms of building high-speed vessels that are “fit for purpose”.  It discusses the challenges of combining design, form and function with the vessel’s occupants uppermost in mind and touches upon how to avoid legal and legislative pitfalls, taking operators’ responsibilities into account.

Bob MacDonald MBE, FInstLM, MCGI
Lt Col RM (retd)

Honours, Awards and Biography:
Military Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)
Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Lion de la République du Sénégal
Commandant General Royal Marines Commendation
Fellow of the Institute of Leadership and Management (FInstLM)
Member of the City and Guilds Institute for Leadership (MCGI)

Following his retirement from the Royal Marines in July 2011 after 33 years of service, Bob MacDonald MBE set up his own business, MacDonald Marine Consultants, specialised in assisting professional, governmental and military organisations facing the complexities of high-speed vessel procurement.  Within this sphere he is especially focussed on human factors, human performance, leadership and safety at sea.

In April 2012 he was invited by the Director of the Dutch Coastguard to assist in the strategic review and restructuring of the operational part of the organisation.

In January 2013 he was invited by the management of Arrow Copter, an Austrian gyrocopter manufacturing company, to assist in the development of their aircraft for future professional use, including maritime surveillance.

He returned to the maritime environment in November 2013 and has been closely involved in the design and build of a new range of 21st century military / governmental interception, boarding and multi-role combat support craft.

He is a dedicated high-speed vessel trainer and lifelong maritime enthusiast, living part-time on board a 55m long former commercial barge.  He is a keen motorcyclist as well as a trainee gyrocopter and fixed-wing pilot.

Developing a new multipurpose high speed boat
Lt. Cdr. Tommi SOVARI, Lieutenant Commander Finish Armed Forces
Jussi MANNERBERG, Nav. Arc. CEO of Boomeranger Boats Ltd

Backround to procuring a multipurpose RIB is explained from the customer viewpoint. How a project can change due to multiple requirements and budget limitation into a succesfull new multipurpose platform. Some considerations are given how the procedure can run between a procurement department, end user and supplier. Cost implications of various requirements are introduced. Additionally some practical solutions are presented on how the craft was made to serve the multipurpose role and adjustability between configurations.

Tommi sorvari: Lieutenant Commande,r Graduated from military academy. Service in amphibious brigade various troop and staff duties, senior staff officer course and procurement technology course national defence college. Present duty project manager material division of the Finnish navy command.

Jussi Mannerberg: Finnish naval architect Jussi Mannerberg is a graduate of the Yacht Design Program of the Southampton (United Kingdom) Solent University. With a background in designing high performance  sail and power boats, he is the CEO of Boomeranger Boats, a builder specializing in high-speed craft for military and government service, in Loviisa, Finland.

 

U.S. Coast Guard Missions, Requirements
– A decade of Increasing Challenges

An overview of the operational requirements and the organizational adjustments made to fulfill the human and mission factors with a decreasing budget.

Henry Irizarry is the Director of International Sales and Support at Metal Shark Aluminum Boats with responsibility for International business development and sales, pre and post sales support, and international program management.

Mr. Irizarry served on active duty in the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard for over 21 years. He began his military career as a U.S. Marine which included postings abroad in Colombia and Switzerland. He then transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard where his service included assignments as a Senior Boat Coxswain, Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer and Instructor, International Counter-narcotics Operations Officer, International Training and Infrastructure Development which included service abroad in Haiti and Costa Rica as a Maritime Operations Liaison Officer. His major command and staff assignments included Command Cadre of a Coast Guard Anti-Terrorism Maritime Unit and Joint Staff Officer at the U.S. Southern Command.

After his military service retirement and prior to joining Metal Shark, Mr. Irizarry served in the federal civil service with the Department of the Army as a Senior Air & Maritime Counter-narcotics Operations Officer. In that capacity, he provided program management oversight and analysis of detection and monitoring programs in the Caribbean, Central and South America.

Mr. Irizarry holds a Master’s Degree in Business Management and has completed Executive Leadership Graduate Programs at Harvard University and Cornell University.

 

Tutorial 2: Conference room 32

Defining Requirements for New Boat Projects and Lifetime Extensions:
Lessons Learned

Lt. Col. Robert MacDonald, UK Royal Marines (R)
Major James Wilton, Australian SAS (R)

James Wilton is a retired Australian Special Forces officer with over 20 years military service. During his time in the Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) he commanded an SAS Water operations Troop and an SAS Squadron. He has also completed a number of operation combat tours to Iraq (3 tours), Afghanistan (2 tours) and East Timor. Currently he is based in Dubai where he is working with the UAE Presidential Guard as a military advisor.

 

Tutorial 4:
Assessment of structural loads, wave impacts and operational limitations of high speed boats

Objective: Participants shall learn which kinds of dynamic exposure cause structural failure, how to predict the relevant loads and how to operate the craft in safe manner.

Topics: Principles of structural design of small high-speed boats using acceleration levels as primary parameter. Defining of safe operational envelope of the craft. Theoretical assessment and experimental measurements of accelerations and structural loads. Accelerometers range and types, measured data processing. Deformations and structural failures, vulnerable areas and monitoring, safety factors and structural design improvements for both composite and aluminium hulls.

 

Tutorial 4: Assessment of Structral Loads and
Operational Limitations of High Speed Boats

Albert Nazarov, Ph.D, Albatross Marine Design
Timothy Coats, Ph.D, U.S. Navy
Michael Riley, The Columbia Group

Acceleration data is routinely recorded by researchers around the world to characterize the dynamic response of high-speed planing craft to wave impacts. The measured responses are then used in numerous naval architecture and marine engineering study areas, including hull structure design, equipment ruggedness, shock mitigation seat evaluations, and crew comfort and safety. This tutorial presents a systematic presentation of the fundamental rationale that overarches these different focus areas, and summarizes computational steps that transition raw acceleration data to repeatable measures for quantifying wave impact load that can be used in all areas of study. The lecturers apply the principles of response mode decomposition using fundamental concepts of solid mechanics, coupled with simplified dynamic input and response theory are presented to suggest that a unified approach to acceleration data processing could lead to synergistic advances throughout the communities of

interest, including full-scale trials and scale-model experimentation. Several examples of full-scale trials data are presented to illustrate the computational steps. Experimental results are summarized, and new empirical equations are presented for estimating variation in peak acceleration as a function of craft weight, significant wave height, and craft average speed. Historical criteria for estimating naval crew comfort and performance are used to illustrate development of ride severity envelopes for high-speed planing craft.

Objective: Participants shall learn which kinds of dynamic exposure cause structural failure, how to predict the relevant loads and how to operate the craft in safe manner.

Topics: Principles of structural design of small high-speed boats using acceleration levels as primary parameter. Defining of safe operational envelope of the craft. Theoretical assessment and experimental measurements of accelerations and structural loads. Accelerometers range and types, measured data processing. Deformations and structural failures, vulnerable areas and monitoring, safety factors and structural design improvements for both composite and aluminum hulls.

Dr. Timothy Coats is the Director for Research and Development at Carderock’s Combatant Craft Division located in Norfolk, VA.  He received his Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics from Old Dominion University in 1996, served NASA Langley Research Center as a NRC Post-Doc until 1998, and worked various Navy-related efforts with Materials-Sciences Corporation and Northrop Grumman until 2003.  Dr. Coats is a co-founder and principal author of the Craft Motion Mechanics and Wave Slam Phenomenology program at the Combatant Craft Division.  He has been very vocal in pointing out proper test and analytical methods with respect to wave-slam (or shock) mitigation since 2003, and has wrestled with his peers in this area of study in order to attain the best value and technology for the user community.  Tim is also responsible for identifying new and emerging maritime technologies and design and analysis tools for the combatant craft community, and for the purpose of transitioning technology to the warfighter that meets either their current requirements or anticipated needs for the future.  Recent and current pursuits include advanced science and technology for Seakeeping, C4ISR, Survivability, Propulsion, Hullform, Power and Energy, Autonomy, Launch and Recovery, Structures and Materials, and Human Performance.

Mr. Michael Riley is a retired civil servant with forty-five years of experience as a research engineer and supervisory naval architect in government and industry, and he achieved the rank of Captain as an Engineering Duty Officer in the U. S. Naval Reserves. He is the author or co-author of more than sixty technical reports and papers dealing with the effects of impulsive loads on high-speed planing craft, surface ships, and submarines. He retired from the U.S. Government Senior Executive Service in 2006 as the Executive Director of Ship Survivability and Structural Integrity at the Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C. He and his wife Brenda now reside in Virginia Beach where he is a research consultant working for The Columbia Group at the Combatant Craft Division of Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock, in Virginia Beach.

Dr. Albert Nazarov holds the degree in Naval Architecture from Sevastopol National Technical University (1996) and Ph.D. in Ship Dynamics from Odessa National Maritime Academy (2004). His experience includes development of stability and damage control software for merchant and naval ships, performance and seakeeping predictions for sailing boats and advanced high speed craft. His current position is managing director at Albatross Marine Design – Thailand-based design office specializing on yachts and pleasure boats, small commercial and special high-speed craft, with special expertise in catamaran design. Albert is the author of about 90 research papers on small craft and ship design; he is a member of RINA, SNAME and currently chairman of SNAME Technical Committee SC-5 ‘Small passenger Vessels’.